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Makrut (Kaffir) Lime Leaves

Makrut (Kaffir) Lime Leaves are a profusely fragrant tropical citrus fruit leaf with a one-of-a-kind striking flavor that is citrusy and floral. We select and sort whole, premium lime leaves from Thailand to offer an easy way to add intriguing, zesty flavor to curries, stews, marinades and more.

  • Citrusy, floral natural kaffir lime flavor

  • Light to dark green leaves

  • Naturally gluten free

  • All natural

  • Manitou Trading Company
    Price: $3.95
    $39.5 / Ounce

    This product will be returning soon!

    Suggested uses

  • Add one-of-a-kind sweet, citrus flavor to authentic Thai and Laotian dishes such as tom yum soup, salads, stir-fry and noodle dishes

  • Use as a substitute for bay leaf for brighter, sweeter broths, soups and stews

  • Use to flavor marinades, cooked rice and syrups for desserts or beverages

  • Basic prep

    Ready to use. Substitute several dried leaves in recipes calling for 1 fresh leaf.

    Storage & handling

    Store in a dry, cool place.

    Ingredients

    Kaffir Lime Leaves.

    Makrut (Kaffir) Lime Leaves grow on thorny, bushy trees. The plant produces small, pear-shaped citrus fruit with bright green, bumpy, wrinkled skin and a highly acidic, astringent juice. The leaves of the tree retain a strong essence of lime flavor and have a unique doubled shape that looks like two leaves joined end-to-end. The attractive jade-green leaves have a clean, fresh and slightly floral aroma and impart a distinctive citrus taste to any dish.

    Makrut (Kaffir) lime leaves are indispensable in Thai cooking, from soups and salads to curries and stir-fried dishes. They are also widely used in Indonesian cuisine. Their exotic aroma permeates and enhances all other seasonings in a way that cannot be achieved through substituting other citrus leaves. Makrut (Kaffir) lime leaves are often used in combination with lemongrass, galangal, ginger, basil, cilantro and chiles. Being quite thick, the fresh leaves must be cut extremely fine to be edible, while dried leaves are best used for infusing long-cooked recipes from which the whole leaves can be removed before serving.

    The juice and rind of the Makrut (Kaffir) lime is used in traditional Southeast Asian folk medicine, where it is valued for its promotion of gum health. It is not uncommon for people in Indonesia especially to use the juice of the lime to brush the teeth and gums. The fruit's essential oils are also incorporated into ointments for treating various conditions, while the rind is thought to be beneficial for digestion and for the blood. The juice can also be used as a household cleanser and natural bleach alternative, as well as a shampoo.

    Classic recipe

    Tom Ka Gai (Thai Chicken Soup)

    This comforting Thai chicken soup features a broth that's laced with galangal, cilantro, lime leaves and lemongrass. Once the fragrant liquid absorbs the flavors, chicken and mushrooms are then simmered in the broth to soak up the deliciously complex flavors.