Mpc: B45 | GTIN:

Black-Eyed Peas

Black-Eyed Peas have a mildly sweet, pea-like flavor and firm texture that absorbs flavors and combines well with other ingredients. Typically paired with grains, this economical and traditional legume provides a complete protein and amazing flavor.

  • Cream colored with black eye on inner curve

  • Approximately 3/8" in length

  • Manitou Trading Company
    Price: $10.85
    $0.68 / Ounce

    This product will be returning soon!

    Suggested uses

  • Combine with rice and collard greens for a well-rounded meal

  • Add to soups or stews

  • Cook, chill and toss with corn, tomatoes and spices for a cold salad

  • Basic prep

    Carefully sort peas and rinse thoroughly. Soak overnight. Rinse and place in a large pot and cover with fresh water. Bring water to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer until tender. Do not over stir or the soft skins can be damaged.

    Storage & handling

    Store in cool, dry place.

    Ingredients

    Blackeye peas.

    Black-Eyed Peas are technically beans, closely related to the mung bean. While it is believed to have been first domesticated in Africa, the crop is now grown in Asia, North America, Europe and Australia. The plants are resistant to drought and enrich the soils in which they grow, making them a productive and critical food source for food-challenged and developing countries.

    The high protein content of these spotted legumes is a rich source of nutrients, especially when combined with whole grains and greens to make well-rounded meals. For many cultures, Black-Eyed Peas are a symbol of prosperity and good luck, such as when traditionally eaten on New Year's Day in the United States (what culture within the US or when was this done?) to provide a brighter fortune to the upcoming year.

    Classic recipe

    New Years Day Black-Eyed Peas

    Black-eyed peas cooked with collard greens are a New Year’s Day tradition in the American south. This recipe mellows the earthy flavor of the greens with a splash of vinegar and a bit of heat from a fresh jalapeño pepper.